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Wieseltier on Deterrence & Iran


Leon Wieseltier has an essay posted at the New Republic that serves as an invitation to everyone to think more clearly about the stakes involved with Iran's effort to gain a nuclear weapon. And, he makes some fine points about the limits of rationality along the way.

TNR recently announced that they were removing the firewall that had previously left some of their content, and all of Wieseltier's essays, available only to paid subscribers. I hope readers will avail themselves of this new, free resource. I can't say I always agree with Wieseltier but I can say that he always makes me think more deeply about any issue he addresses. And, his writing is the gold standard for editorial journalism.

Gay Marriage in UK


This morning's Washington Post has an article on the debate in the UK about gay marriage, specifically the fact that the issue is being pushed by Conservative Prime Minister David Cameron.

“I don’t support gay marriage despite being a Conservative. I support gay marriage because I am a Conservative," Cameron recently said explaining his position. Those are words one is unlikely to hear from, say, Rick Santorum or other U.S. conservatives anytime soon.

\"Western Education is An Abomination\"


Unless you live in Nigeria, or take a special interest in that nation’s politics, you probably had never heard of Boko Haram until last Christmas Day when the group bombed several churches killing some 41 people. On the day when Christians celebrate the birth of the Prince of Peace, Boko Haram intruded with sectarian violence of the ugliest kind, premeditated and indiscriminate, the planned killing of women and children when they were harming no one.

At Catholic University next month, a symposium will be held to examine Boko Haram and the challenge the group poses to Nigeria’s national unity. I asked the symposium’s organizer, Fr. Aniedi Okure, O.P., how “Boko Haram” translates into English. “Western Education is Sinful,” he replied. "Actually, the word 'abomination' is closer to the meaning they intend."

Fever & Chills


If it's springtime in DC, with the weather changing daily, or even hourly, guess who is going to come down with fever and chills! I am getting back into bed but we'll see how the day goes. Hopefully, I will be feeling up to posting later. For now, hot tea, which I hate, lots of juice, which I like, an the homemade chicken stock is defrosting.

Neumayr Doubles Down


A couple of weeks back, George Neumayr at The American Spectator attacked my bishop, Cardinal Donald Wuerl. I wrote about that attack here.

One would have hoped that Neumayr would have taken the time, and the criticism he received, some of it from the right, to think more charitably about the assertions he made in his initial article. Instead, he has doubled down, unleashing more nastiness at Cardinal Wuerl in another article at The American Spectator.

Garnett Responds to MSW


At his blog Mirror of Justice, Rick Garnett has responded to my post this morning.

I shall only note that his response indicates why Garnett is my favorite conservative Catholic sparring partner. His reply is lucid, concise, thoughtful, engaging. He is not out to score points, but tries to advance the conversation. He is right to say that we agree more than we disagree. That said, I still think that there are plenty of conservative Catholics who do the exact same thing that some liberal Catholics do: tailor their religious convictions to suit their politics, rather than starting with their religion and developing political positions therefrom. But, it is an honor, and an education, to engage with Garnett.

Cafeteria Catholics: A Longish Response to Rick Garnett


Notre Dame law professor Rick Garnett has responded to David Gibson, John Allen and myself, regarding comments we made about Pope Benedict XVI’s comments regarding the “certain schizophrenia between private and public morality.” I called attention to the comments here, in which I include a link to John Allen’s article. Here is a link to Gibson’s comments.

It is, perhaps, ironic, that on a different post yesterday, I noted that I sleep better when I find myself in agreement with Professor Garnett. So, I guess I shall be sleeping less soundly tonight.

Garnett writes:

More on ACA at SCOTUS


Jonathan Cohn, at TNR, argues that even raising the issue of the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act, and giving it such a central role in the nation's political discourse - as opposed to an argument about the ACA on policy grounds - represents a win for the far right. But, as is their wont, the far right may have over-played their hand. By focusing almost exclusively on the constitutional issue, and not the many policy difficulties the ACA raises, the far right will have little to say if the Supreme Court rules that the ACA is, in fact, constitutional. As well, the far right will not have much time to craft a response and shift the debate to the policy merits of the ACA before the November election.


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In This Issue

October 21-November 3, 2016

  • Reformation's anniversary brings commemorations, reconsiderations
  • Picks further diversify College of Cardinals
  • Editorial: One-issue obsession imperils credibility
  • Special Section [Print Only]: SAINTS