National Catholic Reporter

The Independent News Source

NCR Today

Morning Briefing


India: A Catholic initiative to popularize yoga. Christ is depicted in a series of yogic posture in an exhibition at Agra's St. Peter's College, adjacent to the historic cathedral, where a sustained effort is being made to populairize the ancient Indian scientific regimen.

Illinois: Lawmaker seeks to get Catholic Charities back in foster care. State Sen. Kyle McCarter introduces legislation.

Philippines: Italian Catholic priest shot dead in church compound in southern Philippines

In charging diocese, prosecutor takes rare step

Pavone a no-show at meeting and reason why


Reporter Karen Smith Welch of the Amarillo Globe-News:


Embattled activist priest Frank Pavone did not respond to Bishop Patrick J. Zurek’s public invitation for a private meeting Thursday, the bishop said.


Zurek included the invitation in an Oct. 6 statement he issued regarding his demand for greater financial transparency from three anti-abortion charities led by Pavone, the largest of which has drawn donations of $7 million to more than $10 million annually since 2004, according to its tax returns.

The statement said Zurek made the invitation to discuss Pavone’s “spiritual progress during this time of prayer and reflection.”

Zurek’s statement garnered coverage from media and bloggers nationwide due to the prominent role Pavone’s Priests for Life plays in pro-life circles. Pavone, the nonprofit’s international director, makes wide use of television, radio and social media to further his groups’ collective mission, and has apparently continued to do so while restricted to Amarillo.

KC bishop charged with failing to report child abuse


See the updated Story here: KC bishop charged with failure to report child abuse

KANSAS CITY, MO. — Bishop Robert Finn of the Kansas City-St. Joseph, Mo., diocese has been charged with failure to report suspected child abuse. The charges, filed in Jackson County, Mo., court were released today.

Bishop Finn appeared in court today and pleaded not guilty to the misdemeanor charge.

A statement from the diocese said that "Bishop Finn denies any criminal wrong doing."

Black (and blue) Berry


There is a new calm on the city streets, a gentle tone in casual conversation, a smile from drivers of even the most clogged highways. Something has radically changed in our urban centers this week: Blackberrys are on the blink.

This outage has been reported as a kind-of-apocalypse, affecting business and affairs of state. But, for me, it is a piece of heaven, a get-out-of-jail-free card on a board game named "Work: You Can't Escape It."

Watch people walking as they ignore the insidious device glued to their belt loops. No one stops suddenly to answer the buzz, no one leans over dangerously to type out urgent messages in a busy crosswalk. And yet, astoundingly, the world turns. The sun rises, shops open, people run errands, the sun sets and the day closes.

Why Brown's decision is good for the US


Gov. Jerry Brown of California on Oct. 8 signed into law what is called the California Dream Act. This state version (of the proposed Dream Act that has been unsuccessful in the federal legislature) allows undocumented students who have successfully attended high school, been accepted into a California college and are attempting to legalize their status to be eligible for state financial aid.

This legislation -- shepherded by Assemblyman Gil Cedillo, Democrat from Los Angeles -- affects a few thousand young men and women, mostly Latinos, who as babies or young children were brought into the U.S. by their undocumented parents.

These children have grown up without legal status. Yet for all practical purposes they are Americans except for that piece of paper. They have gone to our schools and they culturally, including the dominance of English, are Americans. To deny them the financial means to a good college education is not only unfair to these young people -- who through no fault of their own are not legalized -- but it, as Gov. Rick Perry of Texas has said, is impractical.

Cheers and Jeers for Wall Street Protesters


Bloomberg -- the business and finance news service owned and named after N.Y. City Mayor Michael Bloomberg -- has a round up of commentary and a slide show of photos of reactions to the Occupy Wall Street protests.

Not all reaction to the Occupy Wall Street movement has been predictable. Jim Chanos, a hedge-fund chief, and Bill Gross, the highest profile bond-fund manager in America, expressed sympathy for the protesters. And the chief executive of Citigroup Inc. said he'd be "happy to talk with them."

The comments come from business leaders, filmmakers, artists and TV personalities. The only politician commenting is Mayor Bloomberg.

On this day: Battle of Hastings


On this day, in 1066, Duke William of Normandy defeated King Harold of England at the Battle of Hastings.

Click here for a video about "the most decisive, and certainly the most famous, battle ever fought on English soil. William's triumph, and his subsequent coronation as King William I (1066-87), marked the end of Anglo-Saxon England, the creation of new ties with Western Europe, and the imposition of a new and more cohesive ruling class."

Click here for a video about the Bayeux Tapestry.

Morning Briefing


'Hope&Joy' in South Africa: New things, old things and things that are the same


The new business center of Johannesburg is in Sandton, north of the city. New office high-rises dot the horizon and the convention center and underground shopping center at Nelson Mandela Square is world-class and impressive.

One night last week, after speaking to a group of academics at St. Augustine College, we had to cross the city to get home. We were stopped by police at a check point so they could verify the driver's license. Often, I am told, the police ask for money when they stop people. It's illegal but it happens anyway. There are cameras on the roads and highways to check for road or speed violations (just like home) as well as unregistered vehicles. I am not sure how offenders are tracked down.

There are several major shopping malls here. I had to replace the adapter cord for my laptop one morning and our driver (we employ two local young men who have now been with us for years) took me to a nearby mall, where I found what I needed with no trouble.


Subscribe to NCR Today


NCR Email Alerts


In This Issue

October 21-November 3, 2016

  • Reformation's anniversary brings commemorations, reconsiderations
  • Picks further diversify College of Cardinals
  • Editorial: One-issue obsession imperils credibility
  • Special Section [Print Only]: SAINTS