NCR Today

Vatican's visitator: 'Great hope' for 'new flourishing' of religious life

 | 

The women appointed to head up the Vatican’s visitation of U.S. women religious says that the three-year study gave her “great hope for a new flourishing of vibrant religious life” in an interview posted this morning.

Mother Mary Clare Millea’s comments come three days after news that reports of the apostolic visitation have been quietly submitted to Rome.

The email interview, posted at the National Catholic Register’s website, seems to show Millea, who is also the superior general of the Apostles of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, with a fairly positive outlook on the continued role of women religious in the U.S.

In answer to one question on the decline of communities of women religious, Millea responds that she was “encouraged to note” that “many congregations have increased their efforts to present the consecrated life as a viable and joyful way of serving the Church.”

“Conversations on this topic are taking place among religious within their own communities as well as with members of other congregations,” writes Millea.

Attention NCR readers in Philly

 | 

This just in from a reader in the Philadelphia archdiocese:

WHYY radio host Marty Moss-Coane will host a discussion on the closing of the Catholic schools from 10 to 11 a.m. on WHYY 90.9 fm. It is a call-in show. The telephone number is 1-888-477-9499. I’m sure the phone lines will be jammed but it is important that as many people as possible be heard.

WHYY is the local National Public Radio affiliate. Here's link to more info about today's radio show and where you need to go if you want to hear the show over the internet. http://whyy.org/cms/radiotimes/

Daily Bread -- today's scripture

 | 

NCR's sister publication, Celebration, has begun posting reflections on each day's Scripture reading. Here's a link: celebrationpublications.org/dailybread You may want to bookmark it. It's a great way to begin the day.

More about Daily Bread:

The Lectionary provides a kind of spiritual script for the universal church that keeps us, literally, all on the same page as we journey through the liturgical seasons. These short reflections, written by four authors who meet regularly to share the readings, are intended to help daily preachers and others who pray from the assigned scriptures each day to orient themselves to the Living Word addressed to the church in the world.

Morning Briefing

 | 

In recent years, clergy and lay people in the United States have increasingly turned to the church's internal legal system to challenge a bishop's or pastor's decision about even the most workaday issues in Catholic life.

Letters: Response to Philadelphia Catholic school closings

Supreme Court: Religious Groups Given ‘Exception’ to Work Bias Law

Richmond, Va. -- Monk removed as abbey's administrator

Salt Lake City, Utah -- Conference of Bishops pans state immigration laws

Republican Candidates Add Artificial Religious Sweeteners

 | 

I'm against multi-tasking, but I justified the Republican debates as exceptions. Just watching them straight on, without distractions, was too unnerving for me. So I caught glimpses, glanced at a book, canvassed for emails and waited for raised voices.

During what seemed like the 90th scrum, a couple of verbal missles caught my attention. One was Mitt Romney's absolute certainty, as a rebuke to same sex marriage, that wedlock had been the sole province of one man and one woman for 3,000 years and offered as a sort of proof that it had been a "sacrament" for lo those many years.

Even for those in the most hierarchical, traditional churches that espouse marriage as a sacrament that's a stretch. Marriage in pre-Christian times wasn't understood in those terms (a least a thousand of Romney's declared span). And for the length of the Middle Ages most couples didn't have Cana conferences and church weddings. They partnered up and became one under a kind of common law.

Religion should not be end-all in GOP presidential candidates

 | 

I continue to be fascinated by the apparent desire of some voters to link religion with their candidate preferences.

Now that the Iowa caucus and the New Hampshire primary for the Republican Party are over, with Romney the victor in both, the New York Times today is focused on South Carolina. There -- reportedly -- Romney's Mormonism will be a greater issue than before, and there is a great scramble by several candidates for the "Christian evangelical" vote. Perry and Santorum especially are going all-out for this vote, using overtly Christian symbols and messages in their campaigns.

The Constitution says, of course, that "no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the United States" (Article VI, #3). That is a matter of law, but even constitutional clauses cannot control culture or public opinion. Still, it's an ideal.

Especially troubling are any signs that some would vote against Romney because he is Mormon. There are lots of reasons someone might oppose Romney, but his religion should not be one of them.

Court: Oklahoma ban on Islamic law unconstitutional

 | 

In a decision that should be hailed by the U.S. bishops' Ad Hoc Committee on Religious Liberty, a federal appeals court upheld a U.S. district court's decision allowing the Council on American-Islamic Relations in Oklahoma to sue to prevent a xenophobic state law from implementation.

Time will tell if the U.S. bishops are serious about religious liberty by the way in which they come to the defense of Muslims, whose religious liberty appears most threatened in the United States.

From The Associated Press:

An amendment that would ban Oklahoma courts from considering international or Islamic law discriminates against religions and a Muslim community leader has the right to challenge its constitutionality, a federal appeals court said Tuesday.

The court in Denver upheld U.S. District Judge Vicki Miles-LaGrange's order blocking implementation of the amendment shortly after it was approved by 70 percent of Oklahoma voters in November 2010.

Show compassion -- reduce prison sentences

 | 

One of the reasons the United States has a much bigger prison population than the rest of the world is that our prison sentences are longer, and in the last 25 years, they have grown much longer.

In Missouri in 1987, for most men convicted of murder, 12 and a half years was about what they would serve in prison. Today, they would serve 30 years.

That's even a drive-by shooting, a bar fight or shaking a child to stop it from crying, not premeditated murder, shooting a police officer, multiple murders or murder in the process of another felony, like rape or robbery. Those are the crimes that get life with or without parole or the death penalty.

I think it is too much. It is too expensive for society, for one thing. For another, these men and women are rarely a threat to public safety. Murder is the rarest of repeated crimes.

Then there's compassion. Now that's a word I don't use lobbying in the halls of the Missouri legislature.

Pages

Subscribe to NCR Today

300x80-lighthope-web-ad.jpg

NCR Email Alerts

 

In This Issue

April 21-May 4, 2017

NCR_4-21.jpg