National Catholic Reporter

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California right-to-die bill stalls on religious opposition and coercion fears


The California "End of Life Options Act," otherwise known as SB 128 or "right to die," was pulled from a state's Assembly Committee on Health hearing Tuesday after the bill's lead authors said they need more time to convince colleagues struggling with the decision and may hold it until next year.

The bill would provide terminally ill and mentally competent patients who've exhausted all medical options to obtain a prescription for lethal medication, provided that two physicians sign off. Patients would need to affirm the request after a 15-day waiting period.

Jimmy Carter: Jesus would approve of gay marriage


Former President Jimmy Carter said in an interview that he thinks Jesus would approve of gay marriage.

"I think Jesus would encourage any love affair if it was honest and sincere and was not damaging to anyone else, and I don't see that gay marriage damages anyone else," Carter said in a HuffPost Live interview with Marc Lamont Hill published Tuesday.

"I believe Jesus would approve gay marriage," he said. "That's just my own personal opinion."

The Democrats and the Wasserman Schultz problem


As chair of the Democratic National Committee since 2011, Florida congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz is the public face of the Democratic Party. Elected by over 300 Democratic leaders from across the country, she represents the party on talk shows and serves as a major fundraiser and influential strategist. Her leadership has engendered controversy, however, as a result of questions about her integrity and her advocacy of positions placing her well to the right of most of her fellow Democrats.

Why the Supreme Court’s gay marriage decision is not like legalizing abortion


In the wake of the landmark Supreme Court decision legalizing gay marriage, a favorite talking point among social conservatives was that even if they lost a battle, they could still win the war: The ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges was akin to the 1973 Roe v. Wade verdict legalizing abortion, they argued, and opponents would continue to fight, and steadily work their way back to victory.



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In This Issue

October 21-November 3, 2016

  • Reformation's anniversary brings commemorations, reconsiderations
  • Picks further diversify College of Cardinals
  • Editorial: One-issue obsession imperils credibility
  • Special Section [Print Only]: SAINTS