Supreme Court

Supreme Court justices side with church in playground dispute

In a case with implications for more than 30 states that prohibit using public funds for religious purposes, the justices appeared aligned against Missouri’s refusal to include a Lutheran church in a grant program that provides funding to resurface playgrounds and make them safer.

Still no sign of leader for White House faith partnership office

Since winning the election with strong support from conservative evangelical voters, President Donald Trump has invited their leaders to the White House and banned government funding for groups that support or perform abortions overseas.

But he has yet to move on one item that many of them care about.

No one has been named to direct the Office of Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships, which since 2001 has linked government with a broad range of religious groups.

Religiously affiliated hospital pensions at the center of Supreme Court case

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A “sleeper” of a case before the Supreme Court pits three hospitals against employees who object to the institutions’ religious exemption from a federal law that protects pensions.

Religiously affiliated hospitals would have to shoulder an enormous financial burden should they have to comply with ERISA, the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, said Eric Baxter, a senior counsel at Becket, the nonprofit legal institute that argued before the justices March 27 on behalf of the hospitals.

Trump vows to keep fighting for travel ban blocked again by courts

President Donald Trump, during a campaign rally in Nashville, vowed to fight the latest court ruling blocking his executive order temporarily suspending immigration from six Muslim-majority countries and refugee resettlement all the way to the Supreme Court.

"We're going to fight this terrible ruling," the president told a crowd of cheering supporters in Nashville's Municipal Auditorium March 15. "The danger is clear. The law is clear. The need for my executive order is clear."

U.S. Supreme Court weighs in on border shooting of Mexican teenager

The Supreme Court took on a U.S-Mexico border issue Feb. 21 when it examined if the parents of a Mexican teenager can sue the U.S. border agent who shot and killed their son.

During the oral arguments, the justices seemed divided over who was responsible for the action. Some of the justices stressed that it was a U.S. concern since the teen was shot by a U.S. agent; other justices said that since the 15-year-old died on the Mexican side of the border, the case should stay out of the U.S. courts.

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In This Issue

April 21-May 4, 2017

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