Miguel H. Díaz is the John Courtney Murray University Chair in Public Service at Loyola University in Chicago and was selected by President Barack Obama as the ninth U.S. Ambassador to the Holy See. A past President of the Academy of Catholic Hispanic Theologians of the United States (ACHTUS), in 2013, he was the recipient of their prestigious Virgilio Elizondo Award given in recognition for distinguished achievement in theology, and has been awarded honorary doctorates from a number of universities. His scholarly interests include Trinitarian theology, theological anthropology, political theology and Latino/a theology. He is a prolific writer and public speaker. His publications include books, articles and speeches. Diaz regularly contributes to efforts that bridge faith and public life. He has been a consultant to CNN, CNN en Español, Al Jazeera America, BBC News and Fox News. He has conducted interviews that have appeared in a wide selection of national and international newspapers.

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Column

Young Leaders for Peace teach us to make room for difference

I recently accompanied a group of international students to the U.N. to launch a new global effort that asks world leaders to set aside a fraction of their defense budgets to build bridges of understanding, overcome human differences and foster youth-led popular diplomacy.

Column

Guadalupe and the future of our common home

Theology en la Plaza: Celebrating Our Lady of Guadalupe carries special significance this year in light of the Fourth National Climate Assessment Report. She stands in solidarity with Juan Diego and all God's creatures as they face their greatest threat of "crucifixion" and various forms of "extinction."

Column

Are you a Christian identity card carrier?

Theology en la Plaza: The ID cards and passports we carry may provide access and affirm legal status, but they are not the "documentation" needed to identify us as citizens of the heavenly Jerusalem.

Castro's death raises hopes of change for Cuba

For many in Cuba, Latin America, and the world, the rise of Cuba's Fidel Castro ushered a revolutionary change. He became a polarizing figure who was an icon of liberation for some, and an icon of oppression for many others, especially for the over 1.5 million Cuban exiles who fled the island in search of a better life.