Without Buddha I Could Not Be a Christian: Paul Knitter

Without Buddha I Could Not Be a Christian (31 min.)
Paul F. Knitter, author of Without Buddha I Could Not Be a Christian, talks with NCR editor Tom Fox about "double belonging." Knitter explains the concept: "Double belonging is being talked about more and more now, both in the theological academy and in the area of Christian spirituality. I think it’s the term that is used when more and more people are finding that they can be genuinely nourished by more than one religious tradition, by more than their home tradition or their native tradition."

Highlights of this interview appeared in the June 25 issue of National Catholic Reporter. Read them here: Double belonging: Buddhism and Christian faith

The Catholic Worker: 'You go to where there is need' -- Part 1

Episode 1: Works of Mercy and Works of Justice (25 min.)
Rodemann tells Fox about the twin pillars of the Catholic Worker Movement: "The Works of Mercy are responses to the inhumanity dealt to our guests by different dimensions of poverty," he says. "The Works of Justice is a way of living, nonviolently in resistance to the infrastructures that allows, cause and even enhances the mechanisms of poverty."

Rodemann also talks about the Midwest Catholic Worker Faith and Resistance Retreat.

This is an encore presentation. The podcast first aired in May 2008.

All the episodes in this series

The Catholic Worker: 'You go to where there is need' -- 1 of 2

The Catholic Worker: 'You go to where there is need' -- Part 2

Episode 2: How to start a Catholic Worker House (26 min.)
"How does one start a Catholic Worker House," Tom Fox asks. "You go to where there is need," Rodemann says. He also talks about 50 years as a Christian Brother.

This is an encore presentation. The podcast first aired in May 2008.

All the episodes in this series

The Catholic Worker: 'You go to where there is need' -- 1 of 2
The Catholic Worker: 'You go to where there is need' -- 2 of 2

A profile of Rodemann from NCR June 11, 2010: Br. Louis has sought 'to live the message I was trying to teach'

Fr. George Coyne: Science, Faith and God -- 1 of 2

Episode 1: How did the Vatican Observatory come to be? (19 min.)
How did the Vatican Observatory come to be? "The reason is a very simple one," Fr. Coyne tells Tom Fox. In 1582, the calendar had to be reformed. Easter was slipping back -– it was becoming a winter festival. The Jesuit mathematicians and astronomers who Pope Gregory XIII appointed to solve the calendar problem, continued to build telescopes and study the stars. In 1891, Pope Leo XIII formally founded the Vatican Observatory to show that the church has a serious interest in all intellectual human pursuits. Coyne says, Leo appointed religious priests to dedicate their lives to trying to understand the universe through scientific means.

This is an encore presentation. The podcast first aired in May 2007.