Amid Nepal's shattered shrines and temples, a religious fatalism sets in

When a 7.8-magnitude earthquake roared through this Himalayan nation April 25, leaving an estimated 5,500 dead and more than 11,000 injured, shrines and temples were sent crashing to the ground, many of them centuries old and irreplaceable cultural treasures.

According to the United Nations, 600,000 houses have been destroyed or damaged, and 2 million Nepalese will need tents, water, food and medicine. Many here say they will also need God, regardless of what happened to the temples, shrines and churches.

That is, if people believe God is still around.

First Anglican woman bishop in India says critics have been silent

A nun who became the first woman bishop of South Asia's Anglican community said her appointment has silenced critics who believe only men can be leaders in the church.

India's 'untouchables' ask Obama for a visit

NEW DELHI -- Comparing their struggle with America's civil rights movement, India's low-caste Dalits are urging President Obama to take note of their suffering during his state visit next week.

Obama's three-day visit beginning Nov. 6 is meant to deepen economic ties with India, but Dalit activists say he "symbolizes the hope of freedom for oppressed people across the world."