NCR Today

Gaza-bound activists intercepted, describe 'violent' abduction

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Israeli commandos intercepted a two-boat flotilla in international waters Friday afternoon as the vessels attempted to challenge the blockade of the Gaza Strip.

Using warships and water canons, Israeli forces seized the Canadian-owned Tahrir and the Irish MV Saoirse approximately 45 miles from the Gazan coastline, then hauled the vessels' 27 passengers, including Irish parliamentarians, journalists and human rights activists, to Israel.

Seven were deported Saturday. Twenty remained imprisoned in Israel over the weekend, among them Americans Kit Kittredge, a peace activist from Quilcene, Wash., and Jihan Hafiz, a correspondent for the radio/TV news program Democracy Now!

Released Monday night, Hafiz arrived in New York early this morning and was interviewed on Democracy Now!

In a one-minute phone call from Givon Prison on Sunday, Fintan Lane, an Irish historian and writer traveling on the MV Saoirse described the abduction of the Irish vessel as "violent and dangerous."

Cardinal George regrets shooting from hip

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This is the most recent update of a story that dominated Chicago news last weekend.

Cardinal Francis George was on the front page of the Chicago Sun-Times for days after he and the bishops of the other four Illinois dioceses sharply criticized Gov. Pat Quinn for plans to award a woman who has worked for years to counsel victims of rape.

Although he retreated a step or two from the original strong words about mothers killing babies in their wombs, he did not apologize to the counselor or to Quinn.

The incident aroused widespread interest, since it touches on a very sensitive and rarely discussed aspect of Catholic moral teaching, namely that women who become pregnant through rape are obliged to carry the pregnancy through to birth.


Read the full story here.

Hospital files lawsuit over public records request

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University of Louisville Hospital has filed a lawsuit against The Courier-Journal, the ACLU and WHAS-TV in response to the organizations' request that it turn over public records, The Courier-Journal reports.

The hospital's designation -- as a public or private entity -- is at the heart of the lawsuit, which, the newspaper says, could affect a proposed merger with Jewish Hospital & St. Mary's HealthCare and St. Joseph Health System in Lexington, Ky.

The planned merger would give St. Joseph Health System, a subsidiary of the health system Catholic Health Initiatives, majority ownership in University of Louisville Hospital.

Daughters of Charity receive $1 million for clinic

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The Daughters of Charity will receive $1 million toward the construction of a primary care clinic in eastern New Orleans as part of a larger lawsuit settlement with pharmaceutical company Johnson & Johnson, according to this article in the Times-Picayune.

The lawsuit stems from "scores of deaths and complications traced to Propulsid, once a popular heartburn drug," according to the report.

On this day: Duns Scotus

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On this day we celebrate the feast of Bl. John Duns Scotus (1266-1308).

"No one knows precisely when John Duns was born, but we are fairly certain he came from the eponymous town of Duns near the Scottish border with England. He, like many other of his compatriots, was called 'Scotus,' or 'the Scot,' from the country of his birth. He was ordained a priest on 17 March 1291. Because his bishop had just ordained another group at the end of 1290, we can place Scotus’s birth in the first quarter of 1266, if he was ordained as early as canon law permitted. When he was a boy he joined the Franciscans, who sent him to study at Oxford, probably in 1288. . . He probably completed his Oxford studies in 1301. He was not, however, incepted as a master at Oxford, for his provincial sent him to the more prestigious University of Paris, where he would lecture on the Sentences a second time.

--from "John Duns Scotus," by Jeffrey Hause of Creighton University, Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2007, an interesting and friendly introduction to the Subtle Doctor.

Morning Briefing

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UK court: Catholic Church liable for priest wrongs

Ireland -- Catholic bishop of Derry to retire over ill-health

Mississippi Personhood Amendment: As Election Day Nears, Voters Are Narrowly Divided

UK -- Women in the Church – Thoughts from a Laywoman

South Korea -- Priests in Seoul have begun a hunger strike in protest at what they call a nation’s greed that is threatening the environment, peace and economy.

'Priests for Life needs a massive infusion of contributions...'

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Jerry Horn, senior vice president of Priests for Life (PFL), sent a new desperate plea for money in a letter to donors dated Nov. 4, 2011. According to the letter, many supporters have withdrawn their support of PFL because of the controversy surrounding it. Nonetheless, Horn wants to give "Father" a Thanksgiving Day gift by raising $676,618 for PFL. He asks that the donors rush their gift to him today.

Fr. Frank Pavone, the embattled national director of PFL, was called back to the Amarillo, Texas, diocese by Bishop Patrick Zurek for a period of prayer and reflection. Zurek suspended Pavone from active ministry outside the diocese. Pavone failed to show up for a mid-October meeting with Zurek and is seeking a mediator.

Horn's letter is at least the third urgent fundraising letter in the past eight weeks. The first two letters (dated Sept. 22 and Oct. 14, 2011) were written by Pavone.

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December 2-15, 2016

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