Cardinal says pope wants to 'stir things up,' let people ask questions

U.S. Cardinal Edwin O'Brien doesn't know what will come out of the Synod of Bishops set for October, but the former archbishop of Baltimore believes it will be significant.

Shriver's godfather, Cardinal James Gibbons

BALTIMORE -- Since the Jan. 18 death of R. Sargent Shriver, much has been written about his work with the Peace Corps and the Special Olympics, his relationship to one of America's most famous political families and his role as the last pro-life Democrat nominated to a presidential ticket.

But little has been said about his famous godfather.

Born in Westminster, Md., Nov. 9, 1915, Shriver was baptized by legendary Baltimore Cardinal James Gibbons, a family friend who served as his godfather.

The internationally known prelate was a frequent guest at the Shriver homestead in Union Mills, and his young godson often served as an altar boy when the cardinal celebrated private Masses in the family chapel.

The Shrivers owned the B.F. Shriver Co., a canning corporation with about half a dozen factories in Maryland's Carroll County. Young Sargent attended St. John School in Westminster for first through third grades. After his family moved to Baltimore in 1923 when his father took a banking job, Shriver transferred to the "old" Cathedral School in Baltimore for grades four through seven. He later went to the Canterbury School in New Milford, Conn.

Archbishop Borders of Baltimore, dies at 96

BALTIMORE -- Archbishop William D. Borders, who retired in 1989 as the 13th archbishop of Baltimore, died April 19 at Mercy Ridge Retirement Community in the Baltimore suburb of Timonium.

He was 96 and had been battling colon cancer. He was the fourth-oldest living Catholic bishop in the United States at the time of his death.

Renowned for his commitment to collegiality, social justice and a pastoral approach to leadership, Archbishop Borders led the archdiocese from 1974 to 1989. He continued to reside in Baltimore throughout his retirement, maintaining an active priestly ministry well into the last year of his life.

"Archbishop Borders was a man of deep faith, great humility and great love for God, the church and this archdiocese," said Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien, the current archbishop of Baltimore. "As a result, he was universally loved by the people of this local church, by his brother bishops and priests, and by all who were blessed to call him Archbishop, Father, teacher, brother and friend."

Funeral arrangements were incomplete.

Episcopal nuns, priest join Catholic church

BALTIMORE -- After seven years of prayer and discernment, a community of Episcopal sisters and their chaplain were to be received into the Catholic Church during a Sept. 3 Mass celebrated by Baltimore Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien.

The archbishop was to welcome 10 sisters from the Society of All Saints' Sisters of the Poor when he administers the sacrament of confirmation and the sisters renew their vows of poverty, chastity and obedience in the chapel of their convent in suburban Catonsville, Md.

The Rev. Warren Tanghe, an Episcopal priest, also was to be received into the church and is discerning the possibility of becoming a Catholic priest.