Catholic students join Florida school walkouts for gun reform

This article appears in the Gun Violence feature series. View the full series.

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Students at St. Thomas Aquinas High School, in Fr. Lauderdale, Florida, gather on the football field Feb. 21 as part of a solidarity walkout and prayer service for the victims of the school shooting at a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in nearby Parkland. (St. Thomas Aquinas High School)

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

On the field, the Aquinas students recited the names of the 17 victims, praying for each as well as those killed in past mass shootings. They said an Our Father and a Hail Mary, and offered prayers for their community to heal, for people with mental illness, for others who feel alone, and for the ability to recognize and respond to warning signs before alarms go off.  

They also prayed that this time will be different.  

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

 

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly half the population at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, had gathered in silence in a circle around noon Wednesday. It was a part solidarity walkout, part prayer service for the 14 students and three school officials who were killed by a gunman a week earlier at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, less than 20 miles up the road. 

The proximity of the schools, which face each other on the athletic field and occasionally partner for events, meant the latest mass shooting tragedy in America struck too close for many of the students. Hui, 18, had friends at Stoneman Douglas; thankfully, she said, none were injured. But her sister and another friend both knew a student who died.

Alexa Hui was almost in tears by the sight on her school's football field.   

About 1,000 students, roughly hal